A look at the World

The New york Times ran a wonderful piece on must see places. Beautifully photographed by Raymond Meier.

I think my favorite place might be Louis Kahn’s Capital Complex, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Check out a few of my top choices.

Picture 15

Culture vultures always have at least one must-see-before-I-die destination on their list: Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel; Chandigarh, the Le Corbusier planned city in India; Robert Smithson’s ‘‘Spiral Jetty’’ in Utah. These are places that can change the way we see and the way we think, places worth getting on a plane for, particularly now, when travelers are seeking out edifying experiences more than ever. With this in mind, T asked an eclectic group of experts to share their personal meccas. Some choices were iconic, like Walter De Maria’s earthwork ‘‘Lightning Field,’’ in Quemado, N.M., while others, like the ceiba tree in the Little Havana section of Miami on which the artist Ana Mendieta carved her silhouette, are hardly on the Grand Tour. ‘‘Seeing art is always about a personal pilgrimage,’’ says Amy Cappellazzo of Christie’s, who chose Mendieta’s piece. (Brancusi’s ‘‘Endless Column’’ in Targu-Jiu, Romania, was a runner-up.) ‘‘It is a commitment to open-mindedness and belief in the state of wonder.

Picture 9

’’LOUIS KAHN’S CAPITAL COMPLEX
DHAKA, BANGLADESH

‘‘Kahn’s skill at ennobling experience through simple materials grandly used can be sensed at his library in New Hampshire and the ruins of his Trenton Bath House. But it is in the marshy capital of Bangladesh that one of America’s greatest architectural talents can be experienced in all its force.’’
— Barry Bergdoll, chief curator of architecture and design, MoMA

Picture 10STIFTUNG INSEL HOMBROICH
NEAR DÜSSELDORF, GERMANY inselhombroich.de

‘‘It’s a sort of utopian project meets private collection. The extensive grounds are practically left to the wild in a sort of eco-conscious way. In contrast to that, pavilions, like little follies, have been commissioned by artists and architects alike. They house an amazing mixture of works, from ultra-contemporary to modern to traditional. The whole thing is strangely lowbrow, no-nonsense, like a very contemporary, quiet renaissance.’’ — Sarina Basta, curator and writer

Picture 14

KANAZAWA

This town, on the west coast of Japan’s main island, has recently emerged as a place of pilgrimage for both ancient and modern Japanese art and craft. 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art It’s known for its eclectic rotating exhibits, and the striking building is a destination in itself (kanazawa21.jp). Yasue Gold Leaf Museum Kanazawa produces most of Japan’s gold leaf. See excellent examples at this small, thoughtfully curated collection (011-81-76-233-1502). Kenrokuen Garden The site is named for the six attributes (kenroku) considered vital for a perfect garden: space, seclusion, artifice, antiquity, water and scenic views. Myoryuji One of Japan’s most intriguing temples, it abounds with secret passages, hidden rooms and traps designed to protect feudal lords. (011-81-76-241-0888.) AKIKO ROBINSON

GLASS MENAGERIE PATRICK BLANC’S ‘‘GREEN BRIDGE’’ IN THE COURTYARD OF THE 21ST CENTURY MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART IN KANAZAWA, JAPAN.

Picture 13JAMES TURRELL SITES

Four places to experience the artist’s meditations on light and space. Louise Blouin Foundation, London After dark, the 78 windows here emit a transcendental light show (ltbfoundation.org). Pomona College, Claremont, Calif. His alma mater houses an example of his ‘‘skyspace’’ works (pomona.edu/museum). Villa Panza, Varese, Italy Turrell’s piece communes with installations by Dan Flavin and Robert Irwin (fondoambiente.it). James Turrell Museum, Estancia y Bodega Colomé, Argentina The first museum dedicated specifically to the artist (left) is at the Hess Family Winery (estanciacolome.com).

One comment

  1. Pingback: Architecture Blogs

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